Dish

Not everyone enjoys a five course meal on Noritaki China. The dish might be far more humble but a necessity in life in order to survive.

Day 16.

Ah bless. I’m always a soft touch for the under dog. She’s been abandoned by the homeless who have been offered a bed and three meals a day during the lock down. Most had dogs but I don’t think they were invited. She’s starving and has terrible rope marks on her neck. This is the third day she has appealed to me . She has food in her belly since I met her but we live on a small boat and I have a flock of chickens to feed. I will do my best.

Street

Day 15. We have 30 cases and one still in hospital.
On January 18th, a big street party was held in Papeete, Tahiti along the main road. The road was blocked off so that families could have a fun day. So typical of the Tahitians. Today cars could travel through but the occupants needed a permit underlying their reason. Consequently the road was empty. The bars that were bursting at the seams are now closed.
Every evening I enjoy my one hour in a one km radius to power walk for exercise. In keeping with the French system, sport is recognised as being beneficial to overcome this current situation, as well as the lock down.
I feel confident that soon we will be back in the street celebrating the best street party ever. We can wait, it will happen.

Rear view

Happy Chinese New year 2018 from Papeete in Tahiti.

I caught a glimpse of a dragon moving around in a shop yesterday. It wasn’t a big dragon and didn’t look too scary. Ah hang on, Chinese New Year started yesterday, Friday 16th February and carries on to Saturday 3rd March. That explains the dragon. Although, this year is the year of the dog on the ground, so perhaps they should have had a dog. I don’t know. I’m not Chinese.

There are many Chinese shops in Papeete and it would appear that the dragon visits them all. This could take a while.

Today I spotted the dragon, well two boys and accompanying teenage drummers. The lads seemed quite deft at donning their dragon outfit.

The back end of the dragon.

The stockier lad was the rear guard, whilst the little lad climbed into the front face.

Back end of the dragon sorted. Just the head and front legs to go.

Little lad climbes into the front of the dragon costume.

With a ricochet of fire crackers and a fuzz of smoke they were off. I didn’t hear coughing.

The rather sweet dragon is off to visit a Chinese shop.

Ah bless. In my day, they sent them up chimneys.

I’m wondering if they will be back at school in their separate classrooms on Monday. If so, what will they be wearing?

Day 2 “Street” Establishing Shot.

The Instructions.

Capture an establishing shot. A wide angle photo that sets up a scene. Compose the wide shot looking for two basic components, a foreground and a background. Identify your foreground and background as you frame your snap shot.

A street in Papeete, Tahiti.

In the foreground are the painted stairs and the Street Art mural.

Follow the steps down to the street where people are going about their daily business.

In the background across the street are vehicles and the shops.

Bougainville, the  good old days. 

Weaving through the crowded streets of Papeete today, armed with my baguette, I cross the Parc Bougainville and head back to the Marina.

Ha, how times have changed since Admiral Louise – Antoine De Bougainville‘s days. He was an interesting French chap. Having battled alongside Napoleon against the Brits, he then took to the sea again and became the first French explorer to circumnavigate the world with naturalists and geographers aboard two ships. A bit of a scandal here. Botanist Philbert Commercon had a valet to look after him on board. She was Jeanne Baret his mistress and fellow botanist, however, she had to disguise as a man. Jeanne became the first woman to circumnavigate the globe. The pair of them named a flowering plant which they collected in Rio de Janeiro and called it Bougainvillea after their boss. The vibrant flowers reflect the vibrant past.

Bougainville liked Tahiti. He must have been pretty cross to find that a Brit called Wallis discovered Tahiti first. However, he wrote a travel log and the best bit was Tahitian society, describing it as “an earthly paradise where men and women lived in blissful innocence, far from corruption of civilisation”

I dash across the road at the crossing, dodging the vehicles reluctant to stop. It’s a non stop flow of traffic.

I wonder what the great Admiral’s travel log on Tahitian society would say today for his not so earthly paradise. However, the flowers remain vibrant and so does the modern Tahitian society.