Prolific

WordPress weekly photo-challenge

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/prolific/


The Instructions

“This week show us your interpretation of prolific


Pearls, pearls, pearls.

They call them “Black Pearls” because they are produced by the black-lip pearl oyster but they come in different colours.

Papeete is the small capital city of French Polynesia. It is on the main island of Tahiti. Everywhere you look, there are shops selling black pearls. Many of them are outlets for the Pearl farmers from different islands or atolls in French Polynesia.

So many shops sell pearl jewellery .

Some displays are better than others

Easter /Spring theme

This shop’s a bit cluttered.

Market traders sell low quality pearls.

The pearls are graded for quality.

The Tuamotus are said to produce the best quality pearls. The oysters thrive in the pristine waters of the remote atolls. However, the farmers of the society islands claim that they are the ones that culture the finest pearls.

Some pearls cost a fortune.

Phew, just for one pearl.

This necklace costs well over $3000 despite the mouldy display model.

I could buy a new dinghy and outboard motor for that price.

As I wandered around the Pearl shops yesterday, I came across two lovely ladies working upstairs in the market. They sell the cheaper quality pearls and their display is crammed in amongst the cleaning stuff. But for all that, they were marvellous fun to chat with. I didn’t buy any pearls but they insisted on photographing me wearing an enormous pearl necklace.

Fun to chat to these ladies.

Machine used to make the holes through the Pearls

There are other types of pearls. Keshi pearls are small non-nucleated pearls typically formed as by-products of pearl cultivation. I love them.

Keisha pearls

Other jewellery is made from the pearly oyster shells. These fetch good prices as well.

Incidentally the Robert Wan Pearl Museum is the world’s only museum dedicated to pearls. It is located here in Papeete.

Shy

All was calm in the marina this morning, no swell. The Muscovy Duck was catching a few rays of sunshine and appeared dry and relaxed. Breakfast was prepared and ready for us to eat in the cockpit but John had disappeared. I thought it a bit weird that he should choose that moment to spray WD40 on his bikes which are secured near the marina gate.

Moments later I was presented with a rose and a bouquet of local grown flowers from the market. Today is Valentines Day. John admitted to being embarrassed about buying Valentine flowers. I had made one of my card creations for John, not a fair exchange really but it was made with love.

Valentines day can be a cruel day. The teenage school girls in Tahiti are demonstrative with their newly presented roses and often look smug rather than smitten. I’ve seen girls purchasing their own roses from the local garage, glancing quickly around to check that no one in their peer group has noticed. Such is the pressure.

Having purchased a baguette a couple of hours later, I noticed that the flower sellers in the market were having a field day. Men young and old seemed shy and embarrassed as they make their choice of bouquet. Token gesture or completely over the top, what message should they give.

A shy Tane scurrying away with Valentine flowers.

On closer observation I was happy to note that families old and young bought flowers too.

Oh no. Not helium balloons.

I don’t want to be too harsh on the concept of Valentines Day but I loathe the fact that it has become another commercial gimmick. How could you possibly approve of a bunch of flowers containing an inflated Chinese helium balloon. So bad for the environment.

Day 10: “Architecture” — Go Monochrome


The Instructions

Today, look for architectural elements that translate into black and white: sharp lines, patterns, defined shapes, large surface areas, and a mix of very light and very dark colors.


This is the last day of my course, so I took two different scenarios in monochrome.

I photographed all types of architectural structures. The windows and door frame of the Cathedral, the ferry port building, the concert stadium but I wasn’t happy with any of these.

I ended up with an overall picture of the Mairie de Papeete which is the Townhall . The building is rather elegant and lends itself to a photo in both colour or black and white.

Town Hall in Papeete. Tahiti. Using the cookie cream filter.

I felt a monochrome photograph made the building look like a little piece of history waiting to be told.

I couldn’t resist a picture of the men thatching the roof of this next building. The building is a humble toilet block in the Papeete Paofai Park. I thought the scene looked like something out of a bygone era. But instead of thatching the roof reed by reed, it comes in ready thatched strips a couple of meters long, ingenious.

I was testing out the different monochrome shades in these photos.

Thatchers in action. Using a cookie cream filter then a sunshine filter on this shot.
The thatch arrives in strips. Photo using classic monochrome filter.
Vahine toilet block in Paofai Park. Tahiti. Using the grey scale monochrome filter.

Of all the monochrome photos, I like the Mairie Town Hall photo best.

I will have fun experimenting with my photography in the future.

Day 7: “Big” — A Point of View

The Instructions

Today, let’s go big. Photograph something of massive size, inside or outside. Get creative with your shot: Capture all or just part of the subject. Place it in the foreground so it takes up the entire frame. Or shoot it from afar so it appears smaller — yet still prominent.


Papeete in Tahiti might be the capital city of French Polynesia but in reality its pretty small. There are no swanky skyscrapers or grand monuments.

So I had to make do with the old crumbling bandstand in the Vai’ete Square where the Roulotte stands set up in the evening.

Under the bandstand looking across the Vai’ete Square in Papeete.
Where’s the spider?

This is the Bandstand. I tried to make it look a big and important landmark.

The bandstand in Papeete.

Day 5 “Connect” Tag your photo.

The Instructions

Be sure to tag today’s post — and your posts in general — appropriately.

I visited the Papeete Market in Tahiti early this morning. I love the vibrant atmosphere. Despite the rain, everyone was in a jovial mood.

Inside the Papeete Market.

The Sunday market is always special as it’s the Farmers’ Market. It connects the people from the many French Polynesian Islands together for a good old chin wag .

There’s a the core of regular stallholders who operate inside the market complex on a daily basis. At 4 am, the rest of the traders set their stalls up in allocated spots along the streets which surround the market building.

Produce from the Marquesas
Cucumbers any one.
Home grown and carefully prepared products for sale.
Families visit the market early in the morning.

Tahiti has a large Chinese population whose presence has been here for a number of generations. There are many stall holders of Chinese and Polynesian descent. The community is interconnected.

I always buy my herbs from these lovely people.

I realised as I lugged my cache back to the marina, that I had bought far more fruit and vegetables than I intended. The produce was all so fresh. Everyone was so happy, friendly and connected.

Fabulous fresh fruit and vegetables. Pineapple from Moorea, Citrons and Pamplemousse from the Marquesas, Avocado’s, Courgettes, White Radish, Cucumbers, Tomatoes,Passionfruit, Bananas, basil from Tahiti. All from the Farmers Market in Papeete

Pick Your Nose

When I was a kid I loved making Plaster Of Paris models. My favourite was Pinocchio but his nose always fell off as I pealed away the mold.
The Tahitians like to make Tiki statues. Many are ancient but more modern ones are springing up in the Papeete Paofai Park .
The Tahitians don’t have a problem with the noses dropping off, they are flat.
Banksy style flat nosed Tiki , recently moulded and spray painted.
Newly finished stone carved flat nosed Tiki in the Paofai Park.
Moulded modern flat nosed Tiki light
No nose, in fact no face. I don’t think that was the intended prominent feature.
Flat faced Tiki in the Paofai Park.