Rapa Nui


We recently spent a week on Rapa Nui (Easter Island). I would say that “It’s a small island with lots of big stuff.”


 

As lover of flowers, I got a real wow factor from the size of the hibiscus and poinsettias. The flower heads were truly huge.

Even our Lei garlands, presented as a welcome at the airport, were rather grand.

On route to the famous Rano Kau crater

We hiked through a meadow of flowers creating the impression of stepping through an enormous deep pile yellow carpet.

The trees created a striking canopy of orange flowers.

All in all the flora was rather lovely.

Many large dogs roam around the island. The’re wild but friendly. They chase cattle, horses and cars,. Consequently, many of them have broken limbs. On a 23km coastal hike from Anakena to the town of Hanga Roa, we had our personal pack of five stray dogs to keep us company all the way.

We spotted many birds of prey on our coastal hike.

The coast line was rugged with waves crashing over the rocks.

I was pleased that we arrived by air not sea. The few visiting yachts seemed to be having a rough time, seeking a safe anchorage.

Of course Rapa Nui is famous for its cultural, archaeological and historical legacy.

Ahu and Moai
Great expressions

Pukao. The hats, sombreros and top knots.
The petroglyphs
Observation tower, Tupa. Houses, Oronga Village.

I can’t include enough photos to do the place justice. You will have to go and visit.

The most unexpected discovery of the holiday was the elaborate bells played loudly on the Catholic Church clock. The church was just up the road from our accommodation in Hanga Roa. It probably drives the locals mad but I was fascinated.

Despite the fact that we arrived from Tahiti where the Polynesians love their traditional dancing, we enjoyed an evenings entertainment watching a dance show in the town.

We had a brilliant week. Rapa Nui offered us far more than just the famous Moai.

Unlikely

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: (Unlikely)


The Instructions

This week’s challenge is to share a photo of something unlikely.


In the Spring back in the UK I love to see the explosion of pink blossom on and around the Cherry trees. I miss the pink profusion so much. It’s highly unlikely that I will find anything so pretty in Tahiti.

I am wrong. Walking through the Paofai Gardens I find the most beautiful pink trumpet shaped flowers creating a visual delight.

Tabebuia

Tabebuia Rosea locally known as the Pink Poui.

The delicate flowers of the Pink Poui are as beautiful here in Tahiti, as the Pink Cherry blossom back home.

Prolific

WordPress weekly photo-challenge

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/prolific/


The Instructions

“This week show us your interpretation of prolific


Pearls, pearls, pearls.

They call them “Black Pearls” because they are produced by the black-lip pearl oyster but they come in different colours.

Papeete is the small capital city of French Polynesia. It is on the main island of Tahiti. Everywhere you look, there are shops selling black pearls. Many of them are outlets for the Pearl farmers from different islands or atolls in French Polynesia.

So many shops sell pearl jewellery .

Some displays are better than others

Easter /Spring theme

This shop’s a bit cluttered.

Market traders sell low quality pearls.

The pearls are graded for quality.

The Tuamotus are said to produce the best quality pearls. The oysters thrive in the pristine waters of the remote atolls. However, the farmers of the society islands claim that they are the ones that culture the finest pearls.

Some pearls cost a fortune.

Phew, just for one pearl.

This necklace costs well over $3000 despite the mouldy display model.

I could buy a new dinghy and outboard motor for that price.

As I wandered around the Pearl shops yesterday, I came across two lovely ladies working upstairs in the market. They sell the cheaper quality pearls and their display is crammed in amongst the cleaning stuff. But for all that, they were marvellous fun to chat with. I didn’t buy any pearls but they insisted on photographing me wearing an enormous pearl necklace.

Fun to chat to these ladies.

Machine used to make the holes through the Pearls

There are other types of pearls. Keshi pearls are small non-nucleated pearls typically formed as by-products of pearl cultivation. I love them.

Keisha pearls

Other jewellery is made from the pearly oyster shells. These fetch good prices as well.

Incidentally the Robert Wan Pearl Museum is the world’s only museum dedicated to pearls. It is located here in Papeete.

Wheelies.

Noise, dust and polluting fumes are the result of the constant traffic jams along the promenade road in Papeete, Tahiti. It’s a recognised problem which has no solution.

On special occasions such as sports events, the police block off the road to motorised vehicles allowing recreational use to the public.

Road closed by the police, even to the Roulotte trucks.

Sunday was a pollution free day for families to enjoy. People of all ages arrived with their bicycles, trikes, scooters, skateboards, rollerskates…

The road sloping down through the underpass was most popular with the teenagers but small children and grandparents tested it out too.

The latest craze.

It’s good to see people having fun and showing courteous respect to one another to avoid injuries.

What a pity the road can’t be closed every Sunday.

Rise /Set


The Instructions

For this weeks photo challenge, explore the vibrant, hopeful colours of your favourite sunrise or sunset.


Inspiration

It was an oil painting belonging to my Grandparents that inspired my love of sunsets. It was a beautiful painting, reflecting vibrant colours of a sunset across the sea. I knew it would never be mine. That didn’t dissapoint me. After all, it was only the artists interpretation of a sunset, captured on canvas through his eyes. A sunset that never changed.

Ever Changing Sunsets

I’ve enjoyed so many ocean sunsets since we left the UK on our small yacht eight years ago. Every sunset is different.

Tuamotus. With no land ahoy, a sunset makes a stunning contrast from just sea and sky.

Over the reef

Cape Verde

Grenada, Caribbean

On holiday. Lake Havasu in Arizona.

Ominous sky.

From Marina Taina in Tahiti.

Papeete Dock. Tahiti

I could carry on but I won’t bore you.

Sunrise does not hold me in such awe. I associate it with sleeping. At sea on a long passage, the sunrise heralded the end of my watch and John would take over. I’m often asleep for sunrise even though Tahiti comes to life at 5 am.

Sunrise. Bora Bora
Up anchor first light. Heading back to Tahiti from Bora Bora.

Favourite Place.


The Instructions

Weekly photo-challenge. This week, share an image of your happy place, a secret spot you love, or a faraway location you return to again and again.


I like to take my hourly walking exercise through the Papeete Pā’ōfa’i Gardens most evenings. I walk from around 5pm when the temperature is cooler. Many people enjoy leisure time here too.

The beautiful park offers so many activities in a relatively small area.

These are my photos from last evening.

A favourite place for dog walks

Somewhere to sit down and relax.
Or work out with your friends.
Or cycle around
Play beach football
Children busy in one of the the play area.
Ukulele players
Outrigger canoes are launched from the beach in the gardens.
There are six cats living in the gardens. They are fed every night without fail by a lovely retired couple.
In the stadium at the end of the gardens events take place. Last night I heard the French singer Louane doing her sound check before her public performance.

There are beautiful trees and flowers.

Sunset over the water.

This is one of my favourite places to be.