Discover Prompts : Three


On my sports walk I arrived at the To’ata carpark and l spotted a friend. Not only was she feeding the stray cats but she had also fed the hens and the stray dogs. What a lovely lady.
The white dog who I’ve befriended came bounding up to me. I’ve discovered that she has a very shy brother who I’ve also been feeding. Today they were with the park dog greeter. This handsome guy has been abandoned in the park for eight months since his owner died. He’s had to adapt to the park being closed. We’ve all protected him. He was given a red collar but that’s been removed. However, today the three of them played in the car park and the drying up River estuary. Wonderful to see three happy dogs with tails in the air, tearing around with such energy.

Dish

Not everyone enjoys a five course meal on Noritaki China. The dish might be far more humble but a necessity in life in order to survive.

Day 16.

Ah bless. I’m always a soft touch for the under dog. She’s been abandoned by the homeless who have been offered a bed and three meals a day during the lock down. Most had dogs but I don’t think they were invited. She’s starving and has terrible rope marks on her neck. This is the third day she has appealed to me . She has food in her belly since I met her but we live on a small boat and I have a flock of chickens to feed. I will do my best.

Awakening


The Instructions.

Weekly photo-challenge. This week, show us an image of an awakening.


It’s official, the cyclone season is over…. well according to the Muscovy Duck. He must have had some form of awakening.

The Muscovy Duck; as featured in several previous blogs, spent his cyclone season by choice out of the water on the marina pontoons.

He suffered in the heavy rain and looked bedraggled at times, so against my better judgement I fed him.

He responded to my help with a waggle of his tail and a gift of a feather.

Gift

Unfortunately, he had a roucous appetite and what went in, came out quickly. It wasn’t difficult to follow his messy trail along the pontoon.

Gradually as the weather improved, so did his plumage. He flexed his wings and took a few short flights and swimming trips.

My husband and I sailed off to another island over Easter. On our return, much to my delight, we discovered the Muscovy Duck back in the water.

Fending for himself he swims around eating the marine life under the pontoons. His plumage is now magnificent.

When he spots me, he swims over and I have a little chat. He’s mute, which is just as well as he wouldn’t get a word in edgeways.

He’s such a poser. It’s hard to resist taking photos.

So is my Muscovy Duck right? Has he had a ‘spring awakening’? Is the cyclone season really over? I do hope so.

Day 6: “Solitude” — The Rule of Thirds

The Instructions

When composing your solitude shot, think about the placement of your subject. Use the Rule of Thirds to place the subject in your frame, ideally at one of the intersections of these lines, or somewhere along them.


Today I would like to introduce you to the Muscovy Duck, who is a transient visitor to the Papeete Marina. His first appearance some six months ago was somewhat of a mystery, a solitary bird who looked lost, confused and out of place. Now he regularly makes an appearance, he’s very laid back and likes to waddle around the pontoons but he’s always alone. I’ve spotted him on many occasions in the Paofai Park but I think he feels safer in the quiet marina, where folks are kind. Sometimes he’s forced to take to the water because a dog or child has startled him. I don’t think he’s keen on swimming and waggles his tail in annoyance.

I’m using the Muscovy Duck who lives in solitude as my photo theme for the Rule of Thirds.

I think this mid distance shot of the duck on the pontoon allowed me to apply the Rule of Thirds to the best advantage.

Solitary Muscovy Duck on the pontoon in Papeete Marina.

I didn’t think the distance shot worked too well bearing in mind that he’s a duck, not an ostrich, so is quite small in stature. Although it made the solitude point more poignant.

Solitary life of a Muscovy Duck.

Being photogenic, he liked to waddle towards me, so most of the shots were close ups, making it difficult to apply the rules.

Stretching his wings.

Waddling along the pontoon

Any feedback on my application of the Rule of Thirds is welcome.

I was fascinated to read about the Muscovy Duck in the Wikipedia link. Look at the last paragraph under the heading Description. Crikey, may be this explains why this Muscovy Duck is a solitary chap.

Day 4 “Bliss” Add Caption

The Instructions.

What is bliss to you?
See the short description under the photo? That’s a caption. Today add a caption to your image so viewers know what they’re looking at!


Today I saw the blissful look in the eyes of a little dog called Napoleon, he was being gently caressed, secure in the arms of his owner.

Across the road was an adoption booth organised by the charity SPAP. Animal protection service of Polynesia.

It is true when SPAP say:

“Every day, puppies, dogs and kittens are abandoned in the streets. Every day, animals are abused and suffer from the wickedness of man.”

The object of SPAP is the improvement of animal conditions and reduce animal abuse in French Polynesia. The charity provides shelter, sterilisation campaigns, and public empowerment on the topic of animal welfare.

Today at the SPAP adoption booth, despite the rain, the cheery volunteers were optimistic that their two dogs and two puppies would find their forever home. These are the lucky few.

SPAP volunteers at the booth with their dogs for adoption. If they were all adopted, that would be bliss.

This is photo of the SPAP charity booth with the volunteers and animals for adoption. If anyone adopts these little dogs, then they will love you forever in return.

What is bliss for me?

It would be seeing the blissful look in the eyes of a little rescue dog as he was being gently caressed, secure in the arms of his new owner.