Wet and windy weekend.

We battened down the hatches on Shiraz ready to brave out the lousy weather which was forecast for the weekend.

Many boats left the Papeete marina with the knowledge that a North westerly swell can reek havoc here. John spent hours on the computer reviewing the weather forecast information. We decided, with a handful of other boats, to stay.

Saturday night saw squalls with winds of up to 39 knots and it hammered down with rain. But, as John had predicted, the swell wasn’t too bad.

Sunday morning I went out on the bike to look around. At the mouth of the river, muddy water flowed into the sea carrying with it tree trunks and a semi submerged fridge.

The pass to the Papeete port remained open so the ferry service to Moorea remained on schedule. The locals are used to rolling around on the ferries but I expect there were a few green looking, sea sick tourists because it was very rough.

A few hardy va’a people had been out in the brown sea.

Despite the amount of rain on the ground, the burly Tahitian man was doing his daily leaf blowing job. I think the leaves were stuck firmly to the ground but he was jovial and gave me the chakkers.

Today the weather is hot and sunny. The yachts have returned to the marina.

I’ve done the washing. We’ve fished out tree branches, plastic bottles, flip-flops and even a computer from the water.

As the water cleared, I was so pleased to see that the little juvenile bat fish had survived.

More rain is forecast but today’s weather has been gorgeous. We felt quite relaxed after a somewhat stressful weekend.

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Rapa Nui


We recently spent a week on Rapa Nui (Easter Island). I would say that “It’s a small island with lots of big stuff.”


 

As lover of flowers, I got a real wow factor from the size of the hibiscus and poinsettias. The flower heads were truly huge.

Even our Lei garlands, presented as a welcome at the airport, were rather grand.

On route to the famous Rano Kau crater

We hiked through a meadow of flowers creating the impression of stepping through an enormous deep pile yellow carpet.

The trees created a striking canopy of orange flowers.

All in all the flora was rather lovely.

Many large dogs roam around the island. The’re wild but friendly. They chase cattle, horses and cars,. Consequently, many of them have broken limbs. On a 23km coastal hike from Anakena to the town of Hanga Roa, we had our personal pack of five stray dogs to keep us company all the way.

We spotted many birds of prey on our coastal hike.

The coast line was rugged with waves crashing over the rocks.

I was pleased that we arrived by air not sea. The few visiting yachts seemed to be having a rough time, seeking a safe anchorage.

Of course Rapa Nui is famous for its cultural, archaeological and historical legacy.

Ahu and Moai
Great expressions

Pukao. The hats, sombreros and top knots.
The petroglyphs
Observation tower, Tupa. Houses, Oronga Village.

I can’t include enough photos to do the place justice. You will have to go and visit.

The most unexpected discovery of the holiday was the elaborate bells played loudly on the Catholic Church clock. The church was just up the road from our accommodation in Hanga Roa. It probably drives the locals mad but I was fascinated.

Despite the fact that we arrived from Tahiti where the Polynesians love their traditional dancing, we enjoyed an evenings entertainment watching a dance show in the town.

We had a brilliant week. Rapa Nui offered us far more than just the famous Moai.

Liquid

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge.


The Instructions

This week’s challenge, share a photo of liquid in whatever state, shape, or color you happen to capture it in.


The Pacific Ocean is a vast moody expanse of water. I love the textures, patterns and colours of the water that I see as I travel the lagoons of Tahiti and her sister islands.

Swirling currents.

Liquid

A Playground for Watersports Lovers

Our daughter Vickey arrived in Tahiti on the Hawaiian airline flight. She had one thing in mind for her holiday relaxation… Surfing.

So we left the Papeete marina and motor sailed down to Vairao on Tahiti Iti where the serious surfers hang out.

It didn’t take long for Vickey to meet up with old surf friends and make new ones.


Whilst Vickey is out surfing, John takes his bicycle to the dock. Water provides our link to the land.

With the family off sporting, I enjoy capturing pictures of the water around me.

Awakening


The Instructions.

Weekly photo-challenge. This week, show us an image of an awakening.


It’s official, the cyclone season is over…. well according to the Muscovy Duck. He must have had some form of awakening.

The Muscovy Duck; as featured in several previous blogs, spent his cyclone season by choice out of the water on the marina pontoons.

He suffered in the heavy rain and looked bedraggled at times, so against my better judgement I fed him.

He responded to my help with a waggle of his tail and a gift of a feather.

Gift

Unfortunately, he had a roucous appetite and what went in, came out quickly. It wasn’t difficult to follow his messy trail along the pontoon.

Gradually as the weather improved, so did his plumage. He flexed his wings and took a few short flights and swimming trips.

My husband and I sailed off to another island over Easter. On our return, much to my delight, we discovered the Muscovy Duck back in the water.

Fending for himself he swims around eating the marine life under the pontoons. His plumage is now magnificent.

When he spots me, he swims over and I have a little chat. He’s mute, which is just as well as he wouldn’t get a word in edgeways.

He’s such a poser. It’s hard to resist taking photos.

So is my Muscovy Duck right? Has he had a ‘spring awakening’? Is the cyclone season really over? I do hope so.