Unlikely

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: (Unlikely)


The Instructions

This week’s challenge is to share a photo of something unlikely.


In the Spring back in the UK I love to see the explosion of pink blossom on and around the Cherry trees. I miss the pink profusion so much. It’s highly unlikely that I will find anything so pretty in Tahiti.

I am wrong. Walking through the Paofai Gardens I find the most beautiful pink trumpet shaped flowers creating a visual delight.

Tabebuia

Tabebuia Rosea locally known as the Pink Poui.

The delicate flowers of the Pink Poui are as beautiful here in Tahiti, as the Pink Cherry blossom back home.

Favourite Place.


The Instructions

Weekly photo-challenge. This week, share an image of your happy place, a secret spot you love, or a faraway location you return to again and again.


I like to take my hourly walking exercise through the Papeete Pā’ōfa’i Gardens most evenings. I walk from around 5pm when the temperature is cooler. Many people enjoy leisure time here too.

The beautiful park offers so many activities in a relatively small area.

These are my photos from last evening.

A favourite place for dog walks

Somewhere to sit down and relax.
Or work out with your friends.
Or cycle around
Play beach football
Children busy in one of the the play area.
Ukulele players
Outrigger canoes are launched from the beach in the gardens.
There are six cats living in the gardens. They are fed every night without fail by a lovely retired couple.
In the stadium at the end of the gardens events take place. Last night I heard the French singer Louane doing her sound check before her public performance.

There are beautiful trees and flowers.

Sunset over the water.

This is one of my favourite places to be.

Day 10: “Architecture” — Go Monochrome


The Instructions

Today, look for architectural elements that translate into black and white: sharp lines, patterns, defined shapes, large surface areas, and a mix of very light and very dark colors.


This is the last day of my course, so I took two different scenarios in monochrome.

I photographed all types of architectural structures. The windows and door frame of the Cathedral, the ferry port building, the concert stadium but I wasn’t happy with any of these.

I ended up with an overall picture of the Mairie de Papeete which is the Townhall . The building is rather elegant and lends itself to a photo in both colour or black and white.

Town Hall in Papeete. Tahiti. Using the cookie cream filter.

I felt a monochrome photograph made the building look like a little piece of history waiting to be told.

I couldn’t resist a picture of the men thatching the roof of this next building. The building is a humble toilet block in the Papeete Paofai Park. I thought the scene looked like something out of a bygone era. But instead of thatching the roof reed by reed, it comes in ready thatched strips a couple of meters long, ingenious.

I was testing out the different monochrome shades in these photos.

Thatchers in action. Using a cookie cream filter then a sunshine filter on this shot.
The thatch arrives in strips. Photo using classic monochrome filter.
Vahine toilet block in Paofai Park. Tahiti. Using the grey scale monochrome filter.

Of all the monochrome photos, I like the Mairie Town Hall photo best.

I will have fun experimenting with my photography in the future.

Day 8: “Treasure” — Zoom In


The Instructions

Get close to your subject. Use the zoom function in your camera, or physically move closer to it. Often, our goal is to capture as much of a scene as we can. This time, zoom in on your subject or a particular detail to tell a more interesting story.


Today I bought a couple of tickets from the Maison de la Culture in Papeete for the 2018 FIFO International Film Festival. Walking back through the Paofai Park to the marina, I came across one of nature’s little treasures.

We have had wet but warm weather for a number of days now. The combination has given rise to the growth of fungi.

I thought this fungi was rather delightful and deserved to be captured in a photograph. Kneeling down in the moist grass, I zoomed in to take this shot.

Fungi growing in the park

I also took an above shot, of another fungi. It was difficult to recognise it as such but I thought it a rather fun photo.

Looking down at this little treasure.

Another treasure was this Golden Trumpet Allamanda Cathartica.

The flower has bright yellow petals with a gold centre The leaves are green and glossy.

I was trying to capture the rain drops.

I need to practice close up shots because I didn’t think I captured the vibrance of this image.

Day 6: “Solitude” — The Rule of Thirds

The Instructions

When composing your solitude shot, think about the placement of your subject. Use the Rule of Thirds to place the subject in your frame, ideally at one of the intersections of these lines, or somewhere along them.


Today I would like to introduce you to the Muscovy Duck, who is a transient visitor to the Papeete Marina. His first appearance some six months ago was somewhat of a mystery, a solitary bird who looked lost, confused and out of place. Now he regularly makes an appearance, he’s very laid back and likes to waddle around the pontoons but he’s always alone. I’ve spotted him on many occasions in the Paofai Park but I think he feels safer in the quiet marina, where folks are kind. Sometimes he’s forced to take to the water because a dog or child has startled him. I don’t think he’s keen on swimming and waggles his tail in annoyance.

I’m using the Muscovy Duck who lives in solitude as my photo theme for the Rule of Thirds.

I think this mid distance shot of the duck on the pontoon allowed me to apply the Rule of Thirds to the best advantage.

Solitary Muscovy Duck on the pontoon in Papeete Marina.

I didn’t think the distance shot worked too well bearing in mind that he’s a duck, not an ostrich, so is quite small in stature. Although it made the solitude point more poignant.

Solitary life of a Muscovy Duck.

Being photogenic, he liked to waddle towards me, so most of the shots were close ups, making it difficult to apply the rules.

Stretching his wings.
Waddling along the pontoon

Any feedback on my application of the Rule of Thirds is welcome.

I was fascinated to read about the Muscovy Duck in the Wikipedia link. Look at the last paragraph under the heading Description. Crikey, may be this explains why this Muscovy Duck is a solitary chap.

Pick Your Nose

When I was a kid I loved making Plaster Of Paris models. My favourite was Pinocchio but his nose always fell off as I pealed away the mold.
The Tahitians like to make Tiki statues. Many are ancient but more modern ones are springing up in the Papeete Paofai Park .
The Tahitians don’t have a problem with the noses dropping off, they are flat.
Banksy style flat nosed Tiki , recently moulded and spray painted.
Newly finished stone carved flat nosed Tiki in the Paofai Park.
Moulded modern flat nosed Tiki light
No nose, in fact no face. I don’t think that was the intended prominent feature.
Flat faced Tiki in the Paofai Park.