Fenua

Opening events with pomp and ceremony are part of the role you play as the President of French Polynesia.

You arrive as the President: the Country’s major VIP. You and your entourage are welcomed. The traditional greetings continue as you are escorted along the route to the stage, where you will say a few words. No one wants long speeches.

A bit like the shock of the unknown in a ghost train, serious women in bright clothing spring out in front of you. They chant and sing. A man throws baby powder into the air.


It’s all too much. You try to suppress your amusement. Your shoulders start to shake. You give up and burst into laughter, singing along with the women.

You recompose yourself in time to cut the tape of tiare flowers.

This is a happy occasion and everyone is relaxed.

The event from the 3rd to 6th May in the Place To’ata, Papeete, Tahiti is the:

Salon made in Fenua

Fenua means land. There are over 90 stalls set up with people selling locally made French Polynesian products.

Coconut products from Tikehau in the Tuamotus

There’s a 4 day programme of Music, dance, comedy and song all performed on the small stage.

Dance and drumming.
The cow on route to the stage. Mascot for Tip Top ice cream.

With glorious weather, the event is popular keeping the traders busy.

The temporary stalls took a week to erect by strong Tahitian men.

This time next week, the venue will be ready to host a different event.

Prolific

WordPress weekly photo-challenge

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/prolific/


The Instructions

“This week show us your interpretation of prolific


Pearls, pearls, pearls.

They call them “Black Pearls” because they are produced by the black-lip pearl oyster but they come in different colours.

Papeete is the small capital city of French Polynesia. It is on the main island of Tahiti. Everywhere you look, there are shops selling black pearls. Many of them are outlets for the Pearl farmers from different islands or atolls in French Polynesia.

So many shops sell pearl jewellery .

Some displays are better than others

Easter /Spring theme

This shop’s a bit cluttered.

Market traders sell low quality pearls.

The pearls are graded for quality.

The Tuamotus are said to produce the best quality pearls. The oysters thrive in the pristine waters of the remote atolls. However, the farmers of the society islands claim that they are the ones that culture the finest pearls.

Some pearls cost a fortune.

Phew, just for one pearl.

This necklace costs well over $3000 despite the mouldy display model.

I could buy a new dinghy and outboard motor for that price.

As I wandered around the Pearl shops yesterday, I came across two lovely ladies working upstairs in the market. They sell the cheaper quality pearls and their display is crammed in amongst the cleaning stuff. But for all that, they were marvellous fun to chat with. I didn’t buy any pearls but they insisted on photographing me wearing an enormous pearl necklace.

Fun to chat to these ladies.

Machine used to make the holes through the Pearls

There are other types of pearls. Keshi pearls are small non-nucleated pearls typically formed as by-products of pearl cultivation. I love them.

Keisha pearls

Other jewellery is made from the pearly oyster shells. These fetch good prices as well.

Incidentally the Robert Wan Pearl Museum is the world’s only museum dedicated to pearls. It is located here in Papeete.

Day 2 “Street” Establishing Shot.

The Instructions.

Capture an establishing shot. A wide angle photo that sets up a scene. Compose the wide shot looking for two basic components, a foreground and a background. Identify your foreground and background as you frame your snap shot.

A street in Papeete, Tahiti.

In the foreground are the painted stairs and the Street Art mural.

Follow the steps down to the street where people are going about their daily business.

In the background across the street are vehicles and the shops.

Bag a baguette 

Today I cycled to the supermarket to purchase my groceries and a baguette.

The trick, is to return with the baguette in one piece. This is difficult when I’m balanced on Green Dragon with a heavy rucksack on my back, a saddle bag bulging on the back rack and hanging over the handlebars is a cloth bag full of fruit and vegetables, amongst which sits the 67cms long baguette.

Today I returned with my baguette intact.

I paid 50 xpf for the baguette in Carrefour. Most baguettes in French Polynesia cost 53 xpf. They are all subsidised and mass produced.

President Macron wants UNESCO world heritage status for French baguettes. I don’t think he eats the supermarket mass produced ones which are pretty tasteless really.