American dream in Tahiti.

There was a thunderous noise outside the marina yesterday. So much for the local churches asking for silence on a Sunday. Police vehicles with blue flashing lights closed off the road.It turned out to be an event for the owners of American motorbikes and American Jeeps. Both of which made a huge amount of noise when in action.

Once the vehicles were parked on display outside the marina, there was a blissful silence. It lasted all afternoon.

Unlike the vast USA, Tahiti is a tiny island. Papeete the main town, is already struggling to cope with traffic congestion. Although fun for some, and they definitely drew a lot of attention at the event, I wonder if these gas guzzling, noise polluting modes of transport have a place here on the island.

An excellent band belted out classic American hits from the seventies whilst children and youths practiced bicycle stunts.

Others watched the experienced trick bike team fly up a ramp, spin their BMX bikes and land on a huge inflated airbag.

I discovered that BMX means bicycle motocross, it’s an off road sports bicycle used for racing and stunt riding. BMX started in the early 1970s when children began racing their bicycles on dirt tracks in Southern California inspired by the motocross stars.

So the good old Stars and Stripes won over the locals for the afternoon.
With screeching tyres and roaring exhausts the jeeps and motorcycles disappeared as quickly as they arrived.

A short time later the police reopened the road to the normal traffic.

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Back to school in Tahiti.

You can build robots as an after school hobby. How awesome is that.

On Saturday, more than 70 stands were set up in the alleyways surrounding the Cathedral of Papeete.

In this one area, parents could meet the associations offering a wide range of extra curricular school activities. Spoilt by choice, it must have been exciting yet difficult making enrolment decisions.

In my day, there wasn’t a lot on offer. I was a Girl Guide and a member of the swimming club.

Curious to find out more, I went along for a peek.

Dancing

Theatre

Music

I thought this was something to do with vampires! But it was for drum and percussion lessons.

Martial arts proved very popular.

Sports on land, not just football and golf.

Watersports

Scouts

Foreign languages

Japanese and Chinese classes.

Arts and crafts. I think the parents had as much fun as the kids.

Help if needed.

And of course sticky buns.

Having been a brownie, I had to buy some chocolate brownies of course. Delicious.

Heiva fever

We’ve just had the Heiva – Tahiti 2018 competition. The highlight of the year as far as Polynesian dancing goes.

The competition was held in the Place To’ata in Papeete, Tahiti.

Hundreds of people were involved. Groups from around French Polynesia had been training to perfect their dance movements for months.

Rehearsal time in the Place To’ata

It was not just the dancing that was awesome.

The music, choreography and the costume designs were wonderful too.

So many hours had been dedicated by each team member and their families, to produce a mesmerising and enthralling spectacle.

Competition was fierce, I would hate to have been one of the judges.

The heats were held on eight separate evenings over several weeks. Each event started in the dark at 6pm and finished at 11pm.

I went to two of the evening events, the latter being the lauréats or first prize winners.

Heiva is for the Polynesian people but tourists are welcomed . Tourists will always be the quiet observers and should feel honoured, to embrace the flamboyant fever of Heiva.

Holiday fun in the Paofai Park

Yesterday was yet another bank holiday in Tahiti and the weather was perfect.

When it comes to organising events, the Tahitians are second to none. Families flocked to the Paofai Park in Papeete for a day of fun packed activities which are all free of charge.

People bought bags of oranges on sale from the Punaauia festival of the orange. Oranges are collected from the Tamanu plateau in a gruelling race.

As the sun was sinking over the horizon, a big screen was inflated and families gathered on the grass to watch a cartoon film.

Stages were set up near the beach, where groups of musicians played music in their own individual style.

And of course we had another glorious sunset to enjoy from the park.

Liquid

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge.


The Instructions

This week’s challenge, share a photo of liquid in whatever state, shape, or color you happen to capture it in.


The Pacific Ocean is a vast moody expanse of water. I love the textures, patterns and colours of the water that I see as I travel the lagoons of Tahiti and her sister islands.

Swirling currents.

Liquid

A Playground for Watersports Lovers

Our daughter Vickey arrived in Tahiti on the Hawaiian airline flight. She had one thing in mind for her holiday relaxation… Surfing.

So we left the Papeete marina and motor sailed down to Vairao on Tahiti Iti where the serious surfers hang out.

It didn’t take long for Vickey to meet up with old surf friends and make new ones.


Whilst Vickey is out surfing, John takes his bicycle to the dock. Water provides our link to the land.

With the family off sporting, I enjoy capturing pictures of the water around me.

Wheelies.

Noise, dust and polluting fumes are the result of the constant traffic jams along the promenade road in Papeete, Tahiti. It’s a recognised problem which has no solution.

On special occasions such as sports events, the police block off the road to motorised vehicles allowing recreational use to the public.

Road closed by the police, even to the Roulotte trucks.

Sunday was a pollution free day for families to enjoy. People of all ages arrived with their bicycles, trikes, scooters, skateboards, rollerskates…

The road sloping down through the underpass was most popular with the teenagers but small children and grandparents tested it out too.

The latest craze.

It’s good to see people having fun and showing courteous respect to one another to avoid injuries.

What a pity the road can’t be closed every Sunday.