A weekend swim.

In Tahiti we’ve had squally weather and angry seas for a few weeks now. We desperately want to sail across to Moorea and drop the hook for a swim in a blue lagoon but there seems little point when the water is murky.

I decided to get my swim fix at the Papeete municipal swimming pool . On arrival, I handed over my 600xpf and assured the friendly Vahine that I did have my compulsory swim hat. I noticed that there were a few nemo cartoon hats behind the desk, so assumed that anyone without a hat would be loaned one. There was only one man wearing a nemo hat as I entered the water.

The pool is 50 metres long and is divided up into swim lanes.

Lifeguards are on duty.

School lessons take place in term time midweek. Being a Saturday, people were there to keep fit. The seaside is for messing around in the water, not this pool.

The swimming pool is situated near to the Port of Papeete.

Initially I had a lane to myself. A young lady in a pink hat with a mild screw kick joined me. In an anticlockwise direction we swam at roughly the same speed passing at the 25 metre point. I noticed that she changed strokes to front crawl but with her arms thrashing about like the scythes of Boudicea’s chariot. Turning at the end of the pool, I spotted the reason for her antics. Stood pondering, was a large man in small trunks. Was he going to dominate our lane or move on? With great comradery I remembered that I could do butterfly. Our tactics worked and the gentleman went elsewhere. I suppressed my laughter with a splutter, causing the lifeguard to scrutinise me as a potential drowning victim. I guess my silver hat didn’t help, I was probably the oldest person in the pool but not old enough to get in for free.

I felt energised after my swim. As an added bonus, because it was cloudy, I didn’t have the usual sunburnt face with panda eyes from wearing my goggles. Every cloud has a silver lining.

Who knows, this might even be a Banksy on the outside wall of the swimming pool.

Traditional Polynesian power sports. Fruit run.

On the 11th June, we went to the first day of the Heiva Tu’aro Maoni = Polynesian power sports of the ancestors. Many Polynesian countries took part.

Rapa Nui entry.

The event took place in the Paofai Gardens in Papeete, Tahiti. The course was set using cones along the footpath route.

The participants had to run two laps of the course carrying fruit tied on to a pole. There were several race categories.

The contraptions weighed 25 kg or 15 kg. Each fruit pole was weighed on scales.

The fruit was adjusted until the correct weight was achieved for each race category.

The Vahine (ladies) event attracted about ten participants each carrying a 15 kg fruit pole.

There were many more Tanes (men) participating in three events.

Sometimes the fruit fell off.

Later, there was a stage performance by some of the other Polynesian countries.

Tradition dance.

Fire juggling , which included a child juggler!

This was just one day of the annual ancestors sports events. More events followed at different locations.

Street Artists in action. Papeete

I love Street art.

My favourite

This one was done last October and is called herehia.

One of the striking features as you walk around the streets of Papeete, are the massive street art murals, painted on the walls of otherwise faded and sometimes decaying buildings.

Last year I found two artists in action and I was fascinated.

It all kicked off with the Ono’u festival in May 2014. Talented Graffiti and Street artists from around the world, were invited to express their unique street art skills around the city of Papeete.

Now in 2018 there are over 30 murals to discover.

There’s a museum of Street Art in Papeete. It hosts the ono’u event.

I love to see the artists in action from start to finish. So this year we sought a few out.

Difficult wall to work on. Christina Angelina in Papeete

This is how it looks now. All the blue washed away.

And the wall next door.

Vinie in Papeete

During the festival, in the Poafi Park, up and coming local street artists were encouraged to display their talents under the guidance of the experts.

Recently I followed the progress of two local artists in action.

They took four days to produce a bright mural depicting the roots of Tahitian life.

I hope they felt proud to sign their names. I thought it was stunning.

I look forward to seeing many more street artists in action. They are awesome.